Perceived Fragile Masculinity Stifles Sexual Satisfaction and Honest Communication

Summary: Women may alter their own sexual behavior in an effort to protect their male partner’s perceived sense of manhood. Researchers found women who perceived their partner’s masculinity as more fragile tended to lower their sexual satisfaction. Additionally, women in relationships with males who they believed to experience “fragile masculinity” reported more anxiety and poorer communication in their relationship.

Source: Society for Personality and Social Psychology

Women in sexual relationships with men may change their own sexual behavior in an effort to protect their partners’ perceived manhood, a new study finds. The more women perceived their partner’s sense of masculinity as fragile, the more they reported faking orgasms and the lower their sexual satisfaction, according to a new study published in Social Psychological and Personality Science.

Most prior research on manhood focuses on how the cultural view of masculinity affects men and their behavior. This new research examines the subject from the perspective of women who seek to protect their partners’ sense of masculinity, perhaps at their own expense.

“Women are prioritizing what they think their partners need over their own sexual needs and satisfaction,” explains lead author Jessica Jordan of the University of South Florida.

In one study that collected data from 283 women, researchers found that the more women perceived their partner’s manhood as precarious, the more anxiety and poorer communication they experienced, which in turn predicted a lower rate of orgasms and sexual satisfaction. An additional study, involving 196 women, found that participants who were asked to imagine a male partner whose manhood was fragile were also less likely to provide honest sexual communication.

“If a woman is concerned about inadvertently threatening her partner’s manhood, that could lead to a breakdown of communication,” Jordan explains.

This shows a couple holding hands in the sunset
This new research examines the subject from the perspective of women who seek to protect their partners’ sense of masculinity, perhaps at their own expense. Image is in the public domain

In a third study, researchers recruited 157 women in sexual relationships with men from Facebook to complete an anonymous survey about their sex lives. The results showed that women who made more money than their partners were twice as likely as those who did not to fake orgasms.

Jordan discourages interpreting that the decrease in sexual satisfaction and honest communication as the fault of the man or woman involved. She explains that if women have been led to believe that it is their job to protect their partner’s sense of masculinity by withholding sexual feedback, it makes sense for them to do so.

Likewise, if men are not made aware that their behavior (or that of men in general) gives their partner the perception that sexual feedback is not welcome, they are not given the opportunity to tell their partner otherwise.

Future research, Jordan says, should explore this phenomenon within couples, including men in same-sex couples.

While the current research focused on how women perceive and respond to masculine insecurity, Jordan notes that it is important to remember that honest communication and understanding your partners’ sexual needs benefits men as well.

“When society creates an impossible standard of masculinity to maintain,” says Jordan, “nobody wins.”

About this behavioral neuroscience research news

Author: Stephen Waldron
Source: Society for Personality and Social Psychology
Contact: Stephen Waldron – Society for Personality and Social Psychology
Image: The image is in the public domain

Original Research: Closed access.
“Do Women Withhold Honest Sexual Communication When They Believe Their Partner’s Manhood is Threatened?” by Jessica Jordan et al. Social Psychology and Personality Science


Abstract

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Do Women Withhold Honest Sexual Communication When They Believe Their Partner’s Manhood is Threatened?

We explored whether women who perceive that their partners’ manhood is precarious (i.e., easily threatened) censor their sexual communication to avoid further threatening their partners’ masculinity. We operationalized women’s perceptions of precarious manhood in a variety of ways:

In Study 1, women who made more money than their partners were twice as likely as those who did not to fake orgasms.

In Study 2, women’s higher perceptions of partners’ precarious manhood indirectly predicted faking orgasms more, lower sexual satisfaction, and lower orgasms rate through greater anxiety and less honest communication.

In Study 3, women who imagined a partner whose masculinity was insecure (vs. secure) were less willing to provide honest sexual communication, via anxiety.

Together, the studies demonstrate a relationship between women’s perceptions of partner insecurity, anxiety, sexual communication, and sexual satisfaction.

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